Winchester Model 1894 - 'Gun Stories'

The name Winchester and the most famous rifle to emerge from its factories, the Model 1894, are written in large letters across American history. With more than seven million rifles made for everyone from Southern deer hunters, to Western lawmen, to at least three American presidents, the Model 94 redefined the meaning of success, and once again showed the almost magical touch of John Moses Browning.

In a world of synthetic guns and exotic cartridges, it's easy to forget how revolutionary the Winchester 94, with smokeless .30 caliber cartridge, was. It harnessed this vastly increased power in a package that Americans understood, a light, fast-handling lever-action rifle.

In 1927, the one millionth Model 94 was given to President Calvin Coolidge, number 1 ½ million to President Harry S. Truman in 1948, and the two millionth was given to President Dwight D. Eisenhower in 1953. With three presidents and countless lawmen, hunters, and shooters across the country, the Winchester 94 had truly taken over the sporting world.

By 1964 the cost of producing a turn-of-the-century design was becoming prohibitive. Winchester took steps to modernize the manufacture of the rifles including machined parts, hollow roll pins, and unfortunately, an inferior finish to the gun. To many this marked the end of an era, and the new method of manufacturing wasn't received well by longtime Winchester collectors. Original Winchesters were sought at premium prices and the term “pre-64” was hammered into the collectors’ lexicon.


In January of 2006 the US Repeating Arms Company shocked the gun world by announcing the end of production for the Model 1894. Rifles that had been languishing on dealers’ shelves flew out the doors, prices soared. It seemed the classic American rifle had finally run its course, but the future of the .30-30 was far from over.


In 2010 Winchester released two exquisite models of the Model 94 to commemorate the 200th anniversary of the birth of Oliver Winchester. And although these were high-end, limited-run custom rifles, the Model 94 was officially back in production.

At the National Rifle Association show in 2011, the Winchester Repeating Arms Company introduced two new rifles to lead the company into the 21st century. The Model 94 Sporter and the Model 94 Short Rifle, making sure that America's rifle will be available to the next generation of Americans.




GET THE NEWSLETTER Join the List and Never Miss a Thing.

Recommended Articles

See More Recommendations

Popular Videos

All About .300 Blackout

All About .300 Blackout

The .300 Blackout is here to stay, and we take some time to look at new technology surrounding this cartridge. Next, we pit subsonic rivals against each other before stretching the legs of this CQB round out to 600 yards from a short 9-inch barrel.

Beretta

Beretta's New 92X

The 92X Performance model from Beretta was created to satisfy two requirements: Speed and accuracy. Beretta's new competition pistol is uncompromising and aims for top performance.

Armscor Semi-Auto Shotguns

Armscor Semi-Auto Shotguns

We look at the new shotguns from Armscor - the VR80 and the brand new bullpup VRBP100.

Gun Clips with Joe Mantegna - 94 WINCHESTER

Gun Clips with Joe Mantegna - 94 WINCHESTER

Joe Mantegna talks about the origins of the 94 Winchester rifle.

See More Popular Videos

Trending Articles

The Hornady 6.5 PRC (Precision Rifle Cartridge) is a Rifle

6.5 PRC - Magnumized 6.5 Creedmoor

Tom Beckstrand - August 01, 2018

The Hornady 6.5 PRC (Precision Rifle Cartridge) is a "magnumized" 6.5 Creedmoor. It offers...

How-To

9 Most Misused Gun Terms

Kyle Wintersteen - November 21, 2016

"Assault weapon." Sixteen-round "clip." A box of "bullets." When it comes to guns and gun...

A guide on how to pair .223 and 5.56 NATO rifle barrel twist rates with bullet weights. Conventional wisdom says slower twist rates wouldn't properly-stabilize a heavy bullet. On the other hand, faster rates could over-stabilize lighter bullets. This is correct in theory, however, modern ballisticians have all but debunked the over-stabilization theory. All things being equal, it is better to have too much twist than not enough. How-To

Pairing Barrel Twist Rates with Bullets for .223 and 5.56 NATO

Keith Wood - November 17, 2018

A guide on how to pair .223 and 5.56 NATO rifle barrel twist rates with bullet weights....

Reminiscing on another great American lever action. Rifles

Review: Savage Model 99

Craig Boddington - February 11, 2019

Reminiscing on another great American lever action.

See More Trending Articles

More Rifles

The Model 1500 action has been around for a half century, and the latest variation is the Howa American Flag Chassis Rifle, a precision shooting machine in an APC chassis. Reviews

Howa American Flag Chassis Rifle Review

Tom Beckstrand - December 16, 2019

The Model 1500 action has been around for a half century, and the latest variation is the Howa...

Christensen has announced the Ranger 22, a rimfire rifle with a carbon fiber tension barrel built for competition shooters and small game hunters alike. SHOT Show

Christensen Arms Ranger 22 Rimfire Rifle – First Look

Guns & Ammo Digital Staff - January 20, 2020

Christensen has announced the Ranger 22, a rimfire rifle with a carbon fiber tension barrel...

SIG Sauer's newest AR, the SIG M400 TREAD, is short, sweet and ready to serve. Reviews

SIG M400 TREAD AR Pistol Review

James Tarr - November 06, 2019

SIG Sauer's newest AR, the SIG M400 TREAD, is short, sweet and ready to serve.

The FN SCAR 20S is one of the best semiauto platforms around. But can it get any better?  It sure can and here's how. Introducing the FN SCAR 20S in 6.5 Creedmoor. Reviews

FN SCAR 20S 6.5 Creedmoor Review

Jim Angell - February 14, 2020

The FN SCAR 20S is one of the best semiauto platforms around. But can it get any better? It...

See More Rifles

GET THE MAGAZINE Subscribe & Save

Digital Now Included!

SUBSCRIBE NOW

Give a Gift   |   Subscriber Services

PREVIEW THIS MONTH'S ISSUE

GET THE NEWSLETTER Join the List and Never Miss a Thing.