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Top Selling Guns | June 2024

Ruger stands strong during its 75th anniversary celebration.

Top Selling Guns | June 2024

The June edition of GunBroker.com's Top Selling Report, presented by GunGenius.com, is chock full of Rugers in every category, and it seems altogether fitting that we focus on Ruger at this moment in time. Not only are they celebrating their 75th anniversary this year, as you’re reading this in July 2024, it was 75 years ago this month that Ruger received their first Federal Firearms License (FFL) on July 21, 1949.

Ruger Mark IV

Ruger Mark IV Standard 22 LR
Ruger Mark IV Standard 22 LR (Photo courtesy of Ruger)

The Ruger Mark IV, which placed within the top five new semi-auto pistols on this month’s report, is the latest iteration of the rimfire semi-automatic pistol that started it all: the Ruger Standard. Initially, a total of eight barreled pistol receivers were made as test guns for the new design. Ruger Standard serial number 3 is, historically speaking, the most important of that batch. It was purchased by assembly department foreman John L. “Jack” Boudreau, making it the first Ruger gun ever shipped, on September 15, 1949.

Today, the Mark IV stands as a proud descendant of the original design, and its place on the Top Selling Report is proof positive that even three-quarters of a century later, Bill Ruger’s initial design is still going strong - even though it took forever for them to fix the “puzzle piece” reassembly of the gun that vexed shooters for decades!

Ruger American Pistols

 Ruger American Pistol Compact 45 Auto Centerfire Pistol
Ruger American Pistol Compact 45 Auto Centerfire Pistol (Photo courtesy of Ruger)

The Ruger American pistol soared to the top spot in the new semi-auto pistols category this month. It’s an impressive rise, considering that it didn’t even break the top 100 the previous month. The striker-fired, polymer-frame American series pistols were launched into an already-crowded market in December 2015. Available in 9mm Luger and .45 ACP, with or without a manual safety, and in three different sizes - duty, compact, and competition - the guns hold their own in a sea of similarity. It’s a testament to the trust people place in the Ruger name.

Ruger Single-Six

Ruger’s first revolver was the Single-Six. Introduced in 1953, the gun was able to instantly capitalize on the cowboy craze that gripped the American market. You can still get a brand new Single-Six from the factory, but that doesn’t stop this model from placing in the used revolver category. Even though the idea of a single-action rimfire revolver is a simple one, the Single-Six was designed to do complex tasks. The windage- and elevation-adjustable rear sights allow you to dial in for extreme precision shots where other models might let you down.

More than 70 years after its introduction, the Single-Six has evolved with the times. It now has a transfer bar mechanism and loading gate interlock for extra safety, as well as other chamberings that have allowed the Single-Six family to expand into Single-Seven, Single-Nine, and even Single-Ten cylinder capacities.

Ruger Blackhawk

Blackhawk Convertible 357 Mag Single-Action Revolver
Blackhawk Convertible 357 Mag Single-Action Revolver (Photo courtesy of Ruger)

With the tremendous success of the Single-Six, Ruger introduced the Blackhawk wo years later in 1955. Designed for centerfire cartridges, the Blackhawk was first chambered for .357 Magnum, but it was quickly followed up with others and today includes .45 Colt, .41 Rem Mag, and even .30 Carbine. The Blackhawk is holding steady in the used revolver market right behind the Colt Single Action Army, of which resumed production was announced in 1955 alongside the Blackhawk’s introduction.

Ruger Vaquero

 Ruger Vaquero: Stainless 45 Colt Single-Action Revolver
Ruger Vaquero: Stainless 45 Colt Single-Action Revolver (Photo courtesy of Ruger)

Introduced in 1993, the Vaquero is Ruger’s closest offering to Colt’s Single Action Army. Until 2005, the gun was physically larger than the Colt, but subsequent and current production guns are almost the same. The Vaquero has set itself apart from other single-action cowboy-style guns by adopting a number of subtle differences that may not be instantly recognizable to the eye but can be felt immediately when handling and shooting one. For example, the front face of the cylinder is beveled for easier reholstering, and the patented reverse indexing pawl makes the gun easier to load and unload.

The Vaquero is popular with cowboy action shooters, and the gun’s ready availability in a variety of calibers, finishes, and barrel lengths makes it an easy choice for newcomers and seasoned shooters alike.

Ruger Mini-14

MiniI-14 Ranch Rifle (top) and Mini Thirty Rifle (bottom)
MiniI-14 Ranch Rifle (top) and Mini Thirty Rifle (bottom). (Photo courtesy of Ruger)

Television is often credited with making certain guns iconic, and this is certainly the case with the Mini-14. Introduced more than 50 years ago in 1973, the Mini-14 was designed to resemble a scaled-down version of the M14 military rifle chambered in 5.56 NATO / .223 Remington. It wasn’t until a decade later, however, that the A-Team show on TV gave the gun a boost in popularity that remains to this day.

Perhaps it is nostalgia for a time gone by, or just the simple fact that the Mini-14 is a rugged, reliable rifle, this gun remains popular both on the new and used markets. The stainless steel finish and folding stock version - which made a return to Ruger’s catalog this year - is the one made popular by A-Team, and I’m willing to bet this reintroduction will keep the Mini-14 in a top spot on future lists.

Ruger 10/22

Ruger 10/22 Rifles from top to bottom: Carbine, Takedown, Tactical.
Ruger 10/22 Rifles from top to bottom: Carbine, Takedown, Tactical. (Photo courtesy of Ruger)

I think it’s probably safe to say that more people have learned to shoot on a Ruger 10/22 than any other semi-automatic rifle since it was introduced 60 years ago in 1964. Available in a wide variety of different models, it doesn’t matter if you’re a backyard plinker, weekend adventurer, or competition shooter, there’s a 10/22 that will fit your needs. If, for some reason, you can’t find the right gun direct from the factory catalog, you can rest comfortably knowing that the model’s unrivaled support in aftermarket parts means that there’s little - if anything - you can’t configure a 10/22 to do. Undoubtedly, that’s why this little rimfire rifle continues to place, month after month, in both the new and used sections of the semi-automatic rifle category.

Ruger SFAR

Big, heavy, and expensive are three words no one wants to associate with a gun - especially an AR-style gun - but are often a necessity when you step up to larger calibers in that platform. The Ruger Small-Frame Autoloading Rifle, or SFAR, set out to create a rifle chambered for 7.62 NATO / .308 Winchester that was more similar in size to a gun chambered for 5.56 NATO / .223 Remington. Externally, the magwell is the only visual giveaway that this isn’t a standard AR-style firearm. All of the other aspects are similar in size to that of an AR-15 and not the larger AR-10.

When the gun was introduced in 2023, I personally heard a lot of skepticism from fellow shooters. However, the numbers don’t lie, and the Ruger SFAR has jumped up eight places to take the number four spot in the new section of semi-auto rifle sales.

Ruger Hawkeye

Ruger Hawkeye Rifles from top to bottom: Hunter, Predator, Laminate Compact.
Ruger Hawkeye Rifles from top to bottom: Hunter, Predator, Laminate Compact. (Photo courtesy of Ruger)

Summer months are prime time for competitive shooters and hunters looking forward to fall seasons, so it makes sense that the Ruger Hawkeye is holding steady in the bolt-action rifle category. Available in 11 different configurations, the Ruger Hawkeye is a more recent version of their M77 bolt-action rifle. While the M77 dates to 1968, the Hawkeye was introduced in 2006. The gun got a new LC6 trigger, which is lighter, crisper, and easier to adjust, and the stock was recontoured for a better fit for more shooters.

The Hawkeye can be had in every popular hunting caliber of the past 120 years, making it suitable for all game in North America no matter what your personal preference. It’s also available in big bore calibers like .375 Ruger and .416 Ruger, making it popular for African safari hunters. Long-range hunters and target shooters are also brought into the fold, with calibers such as 6.5 PRC and 7mm PRC.

Ruger Red Label

Any time someone delves into the topic of quality over-under shotguns, the Ruger Red Label is sure to come up, and it is often accompanied by the lament that Ruger no longer makes them. Production ceased in 2011 after 33 years, citing slow sales which was no doubt because of the gun’s hefty price tag. Make no mistake, though: the Red Label was never inexpensive. When it debuted in the late ‘70s, the Red Label cost twice as much as its only American-made competitor, the Remington 3200.

The gun was reintroduced again in 2013, but production only lasted a year and was discontinued because of low sales. So, the guns can only be had on the used market, and people’s desire for nostalgia keeps the Red Label near the top of the over-under shotgun category.

Top Selling Guns Sold in June 2024

Source: gungenius.com/top-selling/

To learn more or shop for any of the guns listed, visit Gun Genius at www.gungenius.com/top-selling.

Editor's note: In the report, guns are rated from one to five within each category, with the number one gun being the most popular that month. The numbers are color-coded to show any changes in the ranks from the previous report.

Black = Steady
Green = Up
Red = Down

Source: gungenius.com/top-selling/

To learn more or shop for any of the guns listed, visit Gun Genius at www.gungenius.com/top-selling.

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