Vortex Advanced Manufacturing Group

Vortex Advanced Manufacturing Group

VortexAMG1One of the most exciting scopes to come out this year is the new Vortex AMG. The "AMG" stands for Advanced Manufacturing Group and effectively describes what Vortex has built inside the company. AMG represents a serious investment of time and money so that Vortex isn't beholden to outside manufacturing companies, their interests or their timelines.

When they sat down to design the Razor HD AMG scope, Vortex wanted all the performance of a big 34mm scope in the smaller and lighter package of a 30mm scope. Cutting weight became a priority, but not at the expense of performance.

manufacturing procedures.

If two scopes are built identically, except for the maintube diameter, the smaller maintube will have less field of view and/or less elevation and windage adjustment. Field of view is directly correlated to the size of the lenses in the erector assembly. The adjustment range is mostly determined by the diameter of the erector assembly. The bigger the erector, the less travel it will have. A bigger maintube usually means more room for the erector assembly to move around.


That was true until the new Vortex AMG came along. The new scope is the first time a 34mm-sized erector assembly has been stuffed into a 30mm maintube. If you compare the field of view and erector travel of the AMG to 34mm 6-24X scopes, you'll see that the field of view is almost identical and the elevation and windage adjustment ranges are much larger.


While this might first appear to be impossible, Vortex took the time to explain this to us.

The secret to the huge 34mm-sized lenses in the AMG erector assembly is a new reticle mounting design that is more efficient than other models. Mounting a reticle in the erector normally requires cumbersome brackets and a gang of setscrews to get the reticle centered and held in place. Vortex designed and manufactured a reticle mounting system that doesn't need setscrews and instead uses a streamlined bracket. This new design freed up a bunch of space that Vortex promptly filled with nice, big lenses to give the customer a killer field of view. And they packed it all in a 30mm maintube.

The other big "ta-da!" that comes with the AMG scope is a sophisticated turret system. Vortex likes to use hardened steel for their Razor HD II turret systems so they don't wear out and they don't break. They're also heavy, or they used to be.

For the AMG scope turrets, Vortex wanted to use a hardened steel insert housed in aluminum. This would keep all of the breakable parts produced from the ideal material (hardened steel) and put them into an aluminum housing to shave a ton of weight off the older all-steel models.


See, the way this usually works is a bunch of engineers sit around in a room littered with Mountain Dew bottles and pizza boxes, generating a ton of skull sweat while designing scope stuff. That design then gets shopped around the big optics manufacturing facilities scattered around the world (the best ones are in Japan, Germany and private U.S. VortexAMG4companies). Vortex determined the Razor AMG could only meet their performance and quality goals if they did everything in-house, controlling the entire process from start to finish. So, they decided to invest in their own super-pimp manufacturing facility and — voila! — AMG was born.

The first thing the AMG facility designed and built was a sweet new reticle mounting system and some über-robust lightweight turrets. Both of those cool new products got put into the AMG scope, which is how they made a scope that doesn't weigh much and has all the performance of larger 34mm scopes.

Another fun fact that came from our conference-room chat with Vortex: There are 17 lenses in the new AMG scope. That's significant because lenses are how scope manufacturers manage aberration, or all the bad shit that happens when people try to bend and magnify light.


Pick any cool-guy term like chromatic aberration, fringing, pin cushioning, etc., and the way to get rid of those is through the use of additional lenses. The more quality lenses and coatings a manufacturer uses, the more they can eliminate all types of aberration. More lenses equal more expense, so manufacturers use as many as they feel the market can support. Seventeen. That's a lot of lenses, and that's why the image quality of this AMG is spectacular.

Vortex has built a new hotrod with the AMG (scope and facility). It'll be interesting to see what follows this opening salvo in today's optics war.

GET THE NEWSLETTER Join the List and Never Miss a Thing.

Recommended Articles

See More Recommendations

Popular Videos

Guns & Ammo TV: Wheelgun vs. Pistol

Guns & Ammo TV: Wheelgun vs. Pistol

In this segment of “Pros vs. Joes,” we put competitive shooter and author James Tarr against Guns & Ammo TV cameraman Nathan Wilt. With handguns, they see who can knock down plates the fastest on two Revolution Targets Heavy Duty Plate Racks. Here's the catch: Tarr has to use a Colt King Cobra in .357 Mag. while Wilt shoots a Smith & Wesson M&P9 M2.0 in 9mm.

Trijicon

Trijicon's New Specialized Reflex Optics (SRO)

The Trijicon SRO is specifically designed for pistol use. The wide field of view and clean, crisp dot makes it easy for users to find and track the dot in both target and competitive shooting applications.

Guns & Ammo TV: Shooting 1,270 Yards with the 5.56 NATO

Guns & Ammo TV: Shooting 1,270 Yards with the 5.56 NATO

Guns & Ammo Rifles & Optics Editor Tom Beckstrand was on location in Idaho where he pushed the limits of the 5.56 NATO cartridge in this segment of “Long Range Tech” for Guns & Ammo TV. Pairing a SIG Sauer MCX Virtus rifle loaded with Hornady's 73-grain ELD-M ammunition, Beckstrand attempted to ring steel set at 1,270 yards, an incredible distance for any 5.56-chambered rifle and beyond the typical range for an AR-15.

Guns & Ammo TV: Cameras Don

Guns & Ammo TV: Cameras Don't Lie: 9mm vs .45 ACP

The age-old question, 9mm vs .45 ACP. For some, this has been asked and answered already. For others, the debate goes on. In this segment of “Cameras Don't Lie,” competitive shooters Patrick Sweeney and Jim Tarr head to the range to put the vaunted loads on record, and then consider the footage.

See More Popular Videos

Trending Articles

How-To

9 Commonly Misused Gun Terms

Kyle Wintersteen

"Assault weapon." Sixteen-round "clip." A box of "bullets." When it comes to guns and gun...

From milled slides to optics-included packages, these pistol options are all red-dot sight ready. Handguns

14 Red Dot Ready Pistols You Must See

James Tarr - December 20, 2018

From milled slides to optics-included packages, these pistol options are all red-dot sight...

Whether you're going hunting or to the range, hitting your target is more fun when you have a zeroed rifle scope. Here's how to sight in your rifle scope setup in five quick-and-easy steps. How-To

How to Sight In a Rifle Scope in 5 Steps

Craig Boddington - June 04, 2018

Whether you're going hunting or to the range, hitting your target is more fun when you have a...

The Pulsar Thermion XG50 Thermal Riflescope is the first-ever riflescope to combine a BAE sensor, onboard recording, automatic & manual calibration options, multiple color palettes, and manual focus. Optics

Pulsar Thermion XG50 Thermal Riflescope - First Look

Guns & Ammo Staff - September 02, 2020

The Pulsar Thermion XG50 Thermal Riflescope is the first-ever riflescope to combine a BAE...

See More Trending Articles

More Optics

The Pulsar Thermion XM38 thermal scope is loaded with features that include quick start up, long battery life, recoil-rated up to .375 H&H/12 gauge, all-metal housing, video and still image recording and an app that allows you to Bluetooth the image to a smartphone or tablet. Optics

Pulsar Thermion XM38 Thermal Scope Review

D. Faubion - May 28, 2020

The Pulsar Thermion XM38 thermal scope is loaded with features that include quick start up,...

When researching any type of riflescope, binocular or spotter, the name Vortex pops up just about everywhere you look. All optics they make, even electronic sights, have a lifetime warranty, and they have one of the best service departments in the business backing that up. Optics

Vortex Red Dots

Ilya Koshkin - August 19, 2020

When researching any type of riflescope, binocular or spotter, the name Vortex pops up just...

The Pulsar Thermion XG50 Thermal Riflescope is the first-ever riflescope to combine a BAE sensor, onboard recording, automatic & manual calibration options, multiple color palettes, and manual focus. Optics

Pulsar Thermion XG50 Thermal Riflescope - First Look

Guns & Ammo Staff - September 02, 2020

The Pulsar Thermion XG50 Thermal Riflescope is the first-ever riflescope to combine a BAE...

New for 2020, Nightforce is expanding the NX8 family of riflescopes to include optics in the second-focal plane (SFP), or “F2” as Nightforce labels them. Still operating within the 8X zoom ratio, SFP scopes will appear in 2.5-20x50 and 4-32x50 configurations. Optics

Razor-Sharp Glass

Guns & Ammo Staff - August 05, 2020

New for 2020, Nightforce is expanding the NX8 family of riflescopes to include optics in the...

See More Optics

GET THE MAGAZINE Subscribe & Save

Digital Now Included!

SUBSCRIBE NOW

Give a Gift   |   Subscriber Services

PREVIEW THIS MONTH'S ISSUE

GET THE NEWSLETTER Join the List and Never Miss a Thing.

Get Digital Access.

All Guns and Ammo subscribers now have digital access to their magazine content. This means you have the option to read your magazine on most popular phones and tablets.

To get started, click the link below to visit mymagnow.com and learn how to access your digital magazine.

Get Digital Access

Not a Subscriber?
Subscribe Now