Skip to main content

Trijicon RMRcc Reflex Sight Review – Perfect for Concealed Carry

Trijicon has dominated the Carry Optic landscape on hard-use handguns for years. With the new RMRcc, they plan on dominating the concealed carry market as well.

With the RMR, Trijicon was the first to bring a truly duty-ready pistol-mounted optic to the shooter. Widely adopted by military, police and tactical shooters, the RMR ushered in a new era of pistol-mounted optics to the public.

Until the introduction of the RMR in 2009, pistol-mounted optics were the domain of Open class competition shooters and were generally attached to the gun via a frame mount. At the time, mounting an optic to a slide was unheard of because the movement of the slide could quite literally beat to pieces the insides of then-available miniature optics. The rugged little RMR changed all of that, and the slide milling required for mounting an RMR helped launch the era of high-end striker-fired pistols. Gun companies saw the writing on the wall, and by 2015 optics-compatible versions of common striker-fired guns began appearing in large numbers.

While the early RMR had some teething issues, it was miles ahead of the competition, and the sight could take an absolute beating with its 7075-aluminum construction and the patented ears that lend its iconic “Batman” silhouette. Too, Trijicon has diligently and continuously evolved the RMR, so while there are many competitive optics in the pistol-mounted red-dot category, the RMR remains the king of the hill.

Trijicon RMRcc reflex sight for concealed-carry pistols
The Trijicon RMRcc reflex sight – the little brother to the rugged RMR – is a great option for today’s popular concealed-carry, optics-ready pistols. (Photo courtesy of Trijicon)

One thing the RMR was not well suited for was mounting on the latest generation of concealed carry handguns. Handguns like the SIG Sauer P365 XL and the Springfield Armory Hellcat have managed to squeeze full-size capacity and performance into compact pistols. The RMR is just too big for these pistols, and several other makers have filled the void with compact optics. While these optics generally perform quite well, they lack the RMR’s proven record of rugged reliability. Trijicon was aware of the gap in its catalog but refused to compromise on either durability or performance. They took their time and produced an optic that was worthy of its name: The Trijicon RMRcc.


Trijicon-RMRcc-vs-RMR
A side-by-side comparison of the smaller Trijicon RMRcc reflex sight with the larger footprint of the RMR. (Photo courtesy of Trijicon)

Measuring 2/10 of an inch narrower and 1/10 of an inch shorter than the RMR, the RMRcc is noticeably smaller. While the size difference does not look dramatic on paper, it is quite apparent in person. The body of the optic is manufactured from the same 7075 Aluminum as the original and features the same iconic ears, making this the toughest compact pistol optic on the market. That’s not open for debate, it’s a simple fact. The RMRcc is powered by a bottom-mounted CR-2032 battery, the same arrangement as the original, which, at certain settings, will support nearlyfour years of constant use. The RMRcc is also waterproof to 20 meters, just like its larger sibling. The mounting footprint is proprietary, and while it resembles that of the full-size RMR, it is not the same. The RMRcc’s unique mounting pattern is sure to ruffle some feathers, but Trijicon assured me it was a necessary engineering change to ensure the optic would deliver the durability and reliable, repeatable controls that the RMR is known for, despite the physical limitations of the new optic’s smaller body.


Trijicon-RMRcc-compare-RMR
Another side-by-side comparison showing the sight windows of the Trijicon RMRcc (top) and RMR (bottom). (Photo courtesy of Trijicon)

Available in both 3.25 and 6.5 MOA LED configurations, the RMRcc doesn’t force you to compromise on dot size, and the options should allow for smooth transitions between full-size RMR setups and compact platforms with RMRccs. Brightness adjustments are made with the same sealed rubber buttons as the larger RMR, with intensity increase on the left side of the optic body and intensity decrease on the right side, indicated by “+” or “-”, respectively. The RMRcc features an automatic brightness mode and 8 manual positions. A Button Lock-In Mode prevents accidental adjustments to your preferred brightness setting and the Battery Conservation Mode adjusts the aiming dot to ambient lighting conditions after 16.5 hours without a button push to further extend battery life.

The windage and elevation controls are locatedin the same positions as on the RMR, but users will notice that the adjustmentkeys refer to the movements as "ticks" rather than “clicks.” While theengineers were able to build all of that RMR toughness into the smaller RMRccbody, they were not able to incorporate the positive, tactile "click." Instead,they opted for visible markings on the body to measure movement, hence the "ticks." Each tick moves the dot a distance of three MOA, or three inches at 100 yards. In the more than 1,000 rounds that I put through RMRcc-mounted pistols, as well as the thousands that I witnessed through other shooters’ guns, there were no reported shifts in zero. While I initially dreaded the lack of tactile feedback, it proved to be a non-issue.

Trijicon-RMRcc-Springfield-Armory-EMP
The Trijicon RMRcc reflex sight is a nice option for concealed-carry pistols, such as the Springield Armory EMP pistol.

Shooting the RMRcc was a pleasant surprise. I purposely stacked the deck against it by shooting a pistol with a full-size RMR immediately beforehand. I put just under 300 rounds through a Glock 45 with an RMR and then immediately transitioned to a Glock 45 with an RMRcc installed on it. I pushed myself just as hard, and while there was a noticeable difference initially, by the time I finished the first magazine it ceased to be an issue. I brought the gun up to my eye, my eye caught the dot, I pressed the trigger. There was no appreciable difference in speed or accuracy with the smaller optic. Mounting options will be available for all of the popular full-size and compact pistols and there will also be dovetail adapters for shooters that do not have an optic-ready gun. For 1911 shooters, there is some very good news as the RMRcc fits perfectly within the slide width of a standard 1911, eliminating the visible overhang on RMR-equipped pistols.

Some shooters dismiss the idea of a red dot on a concealed carry gun, but I think that they are mistaken. The dot does have a learning curve, but as long as the shooter’s grip and trigger press are sound, it increases the effective distance of a small handgun exponentially. Likewise, follow-up shots tend to be not only faster, but more accurate. The dot also helps shooters that are getting to that point in their life when the eyes struggle to maintain focus on the front sight.


Trijicon-RMRcc-Smith-Wesson-Shield
The Trijicon RMRcc will be a popular option for concealed-carry pistol owners looking for rugged reflex sights. Here's a view of the RMRcc mounted on a Smith & Wesson M&P Shield.

Shooting a dot-equipped pistol will keep good shooters in the game far longer. The old argument of durability is a moot point at this stage of dot development, as I’ve personally seen more iron-sighted pistols go down at recent classes than dot-equipped guns. Try hammering on a wood post and a steel target frame with your iron sights and see if they move, I’ll bet they do. I used an RMRcc-equipped pistol like a hammer on a wood post, and then loaded it and hit steel at 100 yards; I would trust my life to this optic. While I’m not ready to abandon iron sights wholesale, I am very comfortable with relegating them to back-up status, just like I have on my fighting rifles. In the end, the only thing that matters is getting accurate hits as fast as possible. The dot makes this easier.

Trijicon RMRcc LED Reflex Sight Specs

  • Power: 1X
  • Objective: 19x14mm
  • Adjustments: 3 MOA per tick
  • Length: 1.8 in.
  • Width: 0.9 in.
  • Height: 0.9 in.
  • Weight: 1 oz. (w/ battery)
  • Reticle: 3.25- or 6.5-MOA dot
  • Brightness: 8 adjustable settings; Auto-Brightness and Lock-In modes
  • Battery: CR2032 (one); approx. 4-year life
  • Eye Relief: Unlimited
  • MSRP: $699
  • Manufacturer: Trijicon, 800-338-0563, trijicon.com
Current Magazine Cover

Enjoy articles like this?

Subscribe to the magazine.

Get access to everything Guns & Ammo has to offer.
Subscribe to the Magazine

GET THE NEWSLETTER Join the List and Never Miss a Thing.

Recommended Articles

See More Recommendations

Popular Videos

First Look: Springfield Armory Model 2020 Waypoint Bolt-Action Rifle

First Look: Springfield Armory Model 2020 Waypoint Bolt-Action Rifle

At the heart of the rifle is the Model 2020 action which wish designed and built with very tight tolerances thanks to Springfield's technology-driven manufacturing capabilities The stainless steel action features an integral recoil lug, and pairs with a fluted bolt employing dual cocking cams and an enhanced extractor for high pressure loads. The blueprinted and precisely machined action allows Springfield to offer the Model 2020 with .75" MOA accuracy guarantee. Despite being a production rifle, the Model 2020 should rival more expensive custom builds.

Surefire XSC Micro-Compact Pistol Light: First Look

Surefire XSC Micro-Compact Pistol Light: First Look

Small, lightweight and purpose-built for sub-compact carry guns, Surefire's XSC pistol light takes on EDC illumination segment.

Red vs. Green Lasers: Visibility in Bright Light

Red vs. Green Lasers: Visibility in Bright Light

In this segment of “At The Range,” Handgunning Editor Jeremy Stafford and contributor Patrick Sweeney compare the visibility of red and green lasers in outdoor, sunny conditions.

Trijicon RMRcc Reflex Sight – Perfect for Optics-Ready Concealed-Carry Pistols

Trijicon RMRcc Reflex Sight – Perfect for Optics-Ready Concealed-Carry Pistols

The people asked and Trijicon answered. Introducing the RMRcc miniature red-dot sight for compact, concealed-carry pistols. Trijicon's new RMRcc features the durability and reliable controls that have made the RMR so successful, but its reduced dimensions make the “Concealed Carry” model better suited for the popular small-frame pistols designed for discreet carry and personal defense.

See More Popular Videos

Trending Articles

Some guns are easier to work with than others, but the Ruger American Rifle doesn't require an engineering degree to tinker with; here's a look at some upgrade options to take your Ruger American to the next level, and make it something a bit different.Top Ruger American Rifle Upgrades Accessories

Top Ruger American Rifle Upgrades

Philip Massaro - March 15, 2018

Some guns are easier to work with than others, but the Ruger American Rifle doesn't require an...

The Hornady 6.5 PRC (Precision Rifle Cartridge) is a 6.5 PRC - Magnumized 6.5 Creedmoor Rifle

6.5 PRC - Magnumized 6.5 Creedmoor

Tom Beckstrand - August 01, 2018

The Hornady 6.5 PRC (Precision Rifle Cartridge) is a "magnumized" 6.5 Creedmoor. It offers...

Don't underestimate the fun factor.Review: Remington V3 TAC-13 Shotguns

Review: Remington V3 TAC-13

Brad Fitzpatrick - March 08, 2019

Don't underestimate the fun factor.

The one glaring weakness in the .30-­caliber magnum cartridge lineup is best highlighted by examining the requirement around which Hornady designed the .300 PRC; the requirement came from the U.S. Special Operations Command (SOCOM). .300 PRC Review Rifle

.300 PRC Review

Tom Beckstrand - March 12, 2019

The one glaring weakness in the .30-­caliber magnum cartridge lineup is best highlighted by...

See More Trending Articles

More Optics

Tom Beckstrand explains why you should consider attaching an Aimpoint ACRO to a carbine.AR-15 Mounting Options for the Aimpoint ACRO Red Dot Sight Optics

AR-15 Mounting Options for the Aimpoint ACRO Red Dot Sight

Tom Beckstrand - October 06, 2020

Tom Beckstrand explains why you should consider attaching an Aimpoint ACRO to a carbine.

The Leupold RDS is made of 6061 T6 aluminum and has a beefy 34mm main tube. It comes mounted in Leupold's own AR mount, which has a substantially thick base. The underside of the base has three ribs machined into it to mate like a puzzle to a Picatinny rail. This thing is designed to be knocked around and stay in place.Leupold Freedom RDS Review Optics

Leupold Freedom RDS Review

Alfredo Rico - June 23, 2020

The Leupold RDS is made of 6061 T6 aluminum and has a beefy 34mm main tube. It comes mounted...

Despite their similarities, there are some distinct differences between red dots and lasers. By considering the pros and cons of each, you'll have a better idea as to which is right for you.Red Dot vs. Laser Sights – Which is Best for Pistols? Optics

Red Dot vs. Laser Sights – Which is Best for Pistols?

Richard Nance - June 26, 2020

Despite their similarities, there are some distinct differences between red dots and lasers....

I'll argue that the most advanced red dot and magnifier combination currently available is this: the new Trijicon MRO HD with 3X magnifier. For my supporting evidence, I'd like to draw your attention to its objective lens, manufacturing technique, optic housing material, additional length (versus the original MRO), and reticle.Trijicon MRO HD with 3X Magnifier Optics

Trijicon MRO HD with 3X Magnifier

Tom Beckstrand - August 11, 2020

I'll argue that the most advanced red dot and magnifier combination currently available is...

See More Optics

Magazine Cover

GET THE MAGAZINE Subscribe & Save

Digital Now Included!

SUBSCRIBE NOW

Give a Gift   |   Subscriber Services

PREVIEW THIS MONTH'S ISSUE Arrow

Buy Digital Single Issues

Don't miss an issue.
Buy single digital issue for your phone or tablet.

Buy Single Digital Issue on the Guns & Ammo App

Other Magazines

See All Other Magazines

Special Interest Magazines

See All Special Interest Magazines

GET THE NEWSLETTER Join the List and Never Miss a Thing.

Phone Icon

Get Digital Access.

All Guns and Ammo subscribers now have digital access to their magazine content. This means you have the option to read your magazine on most popular phones and tablets.

To get started, click the link below to visit mymagnow.com and learn how to access your digital magazine.

Get Digital Access

Not a Subscriber?
Subscribe Now