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Trijicon RMRcc Reflex Sight Review – Perfect for Concealed Carry

Trijicon has dominated the Carry Optic landscape on hard-use handguns for years. With the new RMRcc, they plan on dominating the concealed carry market as well.

With the RMR, Trijicon was the first to bring a truly duty-ready pistol-mounted optic to the shooter. Widely adopted by military, police and tactical shooters, the RMR ushered in a new era of pistol-mounted optics to the public.

Until the introduction of the RMR in 2009, pistol-mounted optics were the domain of Open class competition shooters and were generally attached to the gun via a frame mount. At the time, mounting an optic to a slide was unheard of because the movement of the slide could quite literally beat to pieces the insides of then-available miniature optics. The rugged little RMR changed all of that, and the slide milling required for mounting an RMR helped launch the era of high-end striker-fired pistols. Gun companies saw the writing on the wall, and by 2015 optics-compatible versions of common striker-fired guns began appearing in large numbers.

While the early RMR had some teething issues, it was miles ahead of the competition, and the sight could take an absolute beating with its 7075-aluminum construction and the patented ears that lend its iconic “Batman” silhouette. Too, Trijicon has diligently and continuously evolved the RMR, so while there are many competitive optics in the pistol-mounted red-dot category, the RMR remains the king of the hill.

Trijicon RMRcc reflex sight for concealed-carry pistols
The Trijicon RMRcc reflex sight – the little brother to the rugged RMR – is a great option for today’s popular concealed-carry, optics-ready pistols. (Photo courtesy of Trijicon)

One thing the RMR was not well suited for was mounting on the latest generation of concealed carry handguns. Handguns like the SIG Sauer P365 XL and the Springfield Armory Hellcat have managed to squeeze full-size capacity and performance into compact pistols. The RMR is just too big for these pistols, and several other makers have filled the void with compact optics. While these optics generally perform quite well, they lack the RMR’s proven record of rugged reliability. Trijicon was aware of the gap in its catalog but refused to compromise on either durability or performance. They took their time and produced an optic that was worthy of its name: The Trijicon RMRcc.


Trijicon-RMRcc-vs-RMR
A side-by-side comparison of the smaller Trijicon RMRcc reflex sight with the larger footprint of the RMR. (Photo courtesy of Trijicon)

Measuring 2/10 of an inch narrower and 1/10 of an inch shorter than the RMR, the RMRcc is noticeably smaller. While the size difference does not look dramatic on paper, it is quite apparent in person. The body of the optic is manufactured from the same 7075 Aluminum as the original and features the same iconic ears, making this the toughest compact pistol optic on the market. That’s not open for debate, it’s a simple fact. The RMRcc is powered by a bottom-mounted CR-2032 battery, the same arrangement as the original, which, at certain settings, will support nearlyfour years of constant use. The RMRcc is also waterproof to 20 meters, just like its larger sibling. The mounting footprint is proprietary, and while it resembles that of the full-size RMR, it is not the same. The RMRcc’s unique mounting pattern is sure to ruffle some feathers, but Trijicon assured me it was a necessary engineering change to ensure the optic would deliver the durability and reliable, repeatable controls that the RMR is known for, despite the physical limitations of the new optic’s smaller body.


Trijicon-RMRcc-compare-RMR
Another side-by-side comparison showing the sight windows of the Trijicon RMRcc (top) and RMR (bottom). (Photo courtesy of Trijicon)

Available in both 3.25 and 6.5 MOA LED configurations, the RMRcc doesn’t force you to compromise on dot size, and the options should allow for smooth transitions between full-size RMR setups and compact platforms with RMRccs. Brightness adjustments are made with the same sealed rubber buttons as the larger RMR, with intensity increase on the left side of the optic body and intensity decrease on the right side, indicated by “+” or “-”, respectively. The RMRcc features an automatic brightness mode and 8 manual positions. A Button Lock-In Mode prevents accidental adjustments to your preferred brightness setting and the Battery Conservation Mode adjusts the aiming dot to ambient lighting conditions after 16.5 hours without a button push to further extend battery life.

The windage and elevation controls are locatedin the same positions as on the RMR, but users will notice that the adjustmentkeys refer to the movements as "ticks" rather than “clicks.” While theengineers were able to build all of that RMR toughness into the smaller RMRccbody, they were not able to incorporate the positive, tactile "click." Instead,they opted for visible markings on the body to measure movement, hence the "ticks." Each tick moves the dot a distance of three MOA, or three inches at 100 yards. In the more than 1,000 rounds that I put through RMRcc-mounted pistols, as well as the thousands that I witnessed through other shooters’ guns, there were no reported shifts in zero. While I initially dreaded the lack of tactile feedback, it proved to be a non-issue.

Trijicon-RMRcc-Springfield-Armory-EMP
The Trijicon RMRcc reflex sight is a nice option for concealed-carry pistols, such as the Springield Armory EMP pistol.

Shooting the RMRcc was a pleasant surprise. I purposely stacked the deck against it by shooting a pistol with a full-size RMR immediately beforehand. I put just under 300 rounds through a Glock 45 with an RMR and then immediately transitioned to a Glock 45 with an RMRcc installed on it. I pushed myself just as hard, and while there was a noticeable difference initially, by the time I finished the first magazine it ceased to be an issue. I brought the gun up to my eye, my eye caught the dot, I pressed the trigger. There was no appreciable difference in speed or accuracy with the smaller optic. Mounting options will be available for all of the popular full-size and compact pistols and there will also be dovetail adapters for shooters that do not have an optic-ready gun. For 1911 shooters, there is some very good news as the RMRcc fits perfectly within the slide width of a standard 1911, eliminating the visible overhang on RMR-equipped pistols.

Some shooters dismiss the idea of a red dot on a concealed carry gun, but I think that they are mistaken. The dot does have a learning curve, but as long as the shooter’s grip and trigger press are sound, it increases the effective distance of a small handgun exponentially. Likewise, follow-up shots tend to be not only faster, but more accurate. The dot also helps shooters that are getting to that point in their life when the eyes struggle to maintain focus on the front sight.


Trijicon-RMRcc-Smith-Wesson-Shield
The Trijicon RMRcc will be a popular option for concealed-carry pistol owners looking for rugged reflex sights. Here's a view of the RMRcc mounted on a Smith & Wesson M&P Shield.

Shooting a dot-equipped pistol will keep good shooters in the game far longer. The old argument of durability is a moot point at this stage of dot development, as I’ve personally seen more iron-sighted pistols go down at recent classes than dot-equipped guns. Try hammering on a wood post and a steel target frame with your iron sights and see if they move, I’ll bet they do. I used an RMRcc-equipped pistol like a hammer on a wood post, and then loaded it and hit steel at 100 yards; I would trust my life to this optic. While I’m not ready to abandon iron sights wholesale, I am very comfortable with relegating them to back-up status, just like I have on my fighting rifles. In the end, the only thing that matters is getting accurate hits as fast as possible. The dot makes this easier.

Trijicon RMRcc LED Reflex Sight Specs

  • Power: 1X
  • Objective: 19x14mm
  • Adjustments: 3 MOA per tick
  • Length: 1.8 in.
  • Width: 0.9 in.
  • Height: 0.9 in.
  • Weight: 1 oz. (w/ battery)
  • Reticle: 3.25- or 6.5-MOA dot
  • Brightness: 8 adjustable settings; Auto-Brightness and Lock-In modes
  • Battery: CR2032 (one); approx. 4-year life
  • Eye Relief: Unlimited
  • MSRP: $699
  • Manufacturer: Trijicon, 800-338-0563, trijicon.com

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