Skip to main content Skip to main content

Revolution Targets Portable Plate Rack and Heavy Duty Hostage Target

Revolution Targets Portable Plate Rack and Heavy Duty Hostage Target self-reset to add more fun to range time while removing the drudgery.

Revolution Targets Portable Plate Rack and Heavy Duty Hostage Target
Bruce Pendleton shows the author two of his rotating targets. Movement not only gives better hit recognition but is a lot more fun.

While doing a video shoot at the Pendleton Range in Georgia, I was able to engage the entire line of Revolution Targets. They allowed us to concentrate on shooting the guns we had without hassling with targets.

Owned by Bruce Pendleton of Pendleton Safes, Pendleton employs the same “outside-the-box” approach to steel target design that he applies to his safes. Pendleton has come up with an array of targets that aren’t just different — they’re better.

Specifically, Revolution Targets are engineered to be self-resetting to minimize downtime for maximum shooting time. That’s right, no more pulling a rope to reset a plate rack, walking downrange to replace a falling plate or standing up a pepper popper. Each Revolution target resets by either spinning, swinging or turning. But the bottom line is that the shooter doesn’t need to do anything but shoot.

Targets come in two broad categories: Portable and Heavy Duty. The Portable line is more economically priced and designed to be easily transported while the Heavy Duty Line is intended to be left in place for commercial range or agency use. Two of my favorite targets are the Portable Plate Rack and the Heavy Duty Hostage Target.


Portable Plate Rack

Pendleton Targets
Easily set up, the Portable Plate Rack resets itself for more trigger time. (Photo by Gordon Pendleton)

Constructed of AR500 steel, the Portable Plate Rack features six revolving 6-inch plates suspended from the top. When hit, the plates swing backward, providing a clear visual and audio cue to the shooter. The plate then resets to the neutral position, ready to be shot again.


Obviously, painting the plates a color that contrasts well from the rack will help them stand out when aiming and when swinging after bullet impact.

The quarter-inch plate version is designed for handguns while the .75-inch plate version is built to withstand rifle fire. The system consists of a steel stand that connects to the plate rack with two vertically positioned 2-by-4-foot boards. The height of the target can be adjusted based on the length of the boards used.

Either version can be transported and assembled by one person. This is a viable option for when you can’t permanently store a plate rack at your range.

The Portable Plate Rack has a list price starting at $900.




Heavy Duty Hostage Target

Pendleton Targets
The Heavy Duty Hostage Target is intelligently designed and over-built. Every component is bolted on for easy replacement should the need arise. (Photo by Gordon Pendleton)

Unlike the Portable Plate Rack, transporting the Heavy Duty Hostage Target is not a one-person job. It, like all other targets in the Heavy Duty line, is constructed of AR500 steel for both impact and shield surfaces. This target is built to take a beating.

The main target area is comprised of a single piece of steel, separated by a vertical “no-shoot” line into two simulated head and torso targets. The bottom of the target is connected to a swivel, which allows the target to rotate horizontally when impacted by a bullet. There are two 6-inch plates near the bottom of the unit that are excellent for practicing precise shots, as would be required when engaging a hostage taker.

The target has a 30-­degree forward cant and metal guards on either side to direct bullet fragmentation away from the shooter. This is an important safety feature when shooting the target at close range.


This target is intelligently designed and over-built. Every component of the Hostage Target is bolted on for easy replacement should the need arise.

To use the target for hostage rescue, simply paint one side a different color to designate it as the hostage taker. The target can also be used as a way to practice shooting moving targets and targets that are angled away from you. With proper timing and accuracy, you can shoot one side of the target to get it rocking back and forth then additional well-placed shots will get it to spin all the way around.

The target can also be engaged with a rifle at distance. At say 300 yards, getting visual confirmation of a hit without having to walk up to reset that target is a tremendous advantage. It translates into more trigger time, which is always a good thing.

The Heavy Duty Hostage Target lists for $2,550.

Sources:

Revolution Targets
revolutiontargets.com


AR-15

To read more articles like this, click here to purchase a print or digital copy of AR-15.

Current Magazine Cover

Enjoy articles like this?

Subscribe to the magazine.

Get access to everything Guns & Ammo has to offer.
Subscribe to the Magazine

GET THE NEWSLETTER Join the List and Never Miss a Thing.

Recommended Articles

Popular Videos

Shooting 1,270 Yards with a 5.56 NATO AR-15 Rifle

Shooting 1,270 Yards with a 5.56 NATO AR-15 Rifle

Guns & Ammo Rifles & Optics Editor Tom Beckstrand pushes the limits of the 5.56 NATO cartridge in this segment of “Long Range Tech” for Guns & Ammo TV. Pairing a SIG Sauer MCX Virtus rifle loaded with Hornady 73-grain ELD-M ammunition, Beckstrand attempted to ring steel set at 1,270 yards, an incredible distance for any 5.56-chambered rifle and beyond the typical range for an AR-15.

Guns & Ammo TV: 6.5 Creedmoor vs. .375 H&H

Guns & Ammo TV: 6.5 Creedmoor vs. .375 H&H

The 6.5 Creedmoor and the .375 H&H are almost complete opposites, or are they? The 6.5 Creedmoor is a newer and popular cartridge that transcends long-range precision rifle shooting and hunting big game. The .375 H&H is more than a century old, but still a popular and versatile choice for hunting big and dangerous game. For this shoot, Pro Tom Beckstrand, former U.S. Army Special Operations officer and sniper team leader, faces off against Guns & Ammo TV cameraman Ben LaLonde in a challenge that highlights the differences between these two cartridges.

Drive Tanks: Browning M2 .50 BMG - The

Drive Tanks: Browning M2 .50 BMG - The 'Ma Deuce'

Gunsmith Glenn Fleming and Gun & Ammo's Tom Beckstrand dive into the history of the iconic Browning M2 .50 BMG, the "Ma Deuce" machine gun.

See All Videos

Magazine Cover

GET THE MAGAZINE Subscribe & Save

Digital Now Included!

SUBSCRIBE NOW

Give a Gift   |   Subscriber Services

PREVIEW THIS MONTH'S ISSUE

Buy Digital Single Issues

Don't miss an issue.
Buy single digital issue for your phone or tablet.

Buy Single Digital Issue on the Guns & Ammo App

Other Magazines

See All Other Magazines

Special Interest Magazines

See All Special Interest Magazines

GET THE NEWSLETTER Join the List and Never Miss a Thing.

Get the top Guns & Ammo stories delivered right to your inbox every week.

Phone Icon

Get Digital Access.

All Guns and Ammo subscribers now have digital access to their magazine content. This means you have the option to read your magazine on most popular phones and tablets.

To get started, click the link below to visit mymagnow.com and learn how to access your digital magazine.

Get Digital Access

Not a Subscriber?
Subscribe Now