Skip to main content

Pairing Barrel Twist Rates with Bullets for .223 and 5.56 NATO

A guide on how to pair .223 / 5.56 NATO rifle barrel twist rates with bullet weights. Conventional wisdom says slower twist rates wouldn't properly stabilize a heavy bullet. On the other hand, faster rates could over-stabilize lighter bullets. This is correct in theory, however ...

When the U.S. military first adopted the M16 rifle in the 1960s, the M193 cartridge and its 55-grain bullet was standard. The earliest issued variations of Eugene Stoner's "Black Rifle" came with relatively slow rifling twist rates of 1-in-14 inches. Shortly thereafter, nearly all M16s and M16A1s were being issued with faster 1-in-12-inch twist barrels.

In more modern times, bullets for military and civilian use have migrated to longer, heavier designs and twist rates have been altered to stay in-sync with this progression. With so many bullets and twist rates available these days, keeping track of which ammunition is compatible with your barrel can be overwhelming.

Before we get into the weeds on individual twist rates, let's take a minute to discuss rifling in general. "Rifling" are the lands and grooves impregnated into the barrel's interior that impart spin on a projectile as it travels down the bore. This spin stabilizes the bullet in flight, much the way a football is "spiraled" by a quarterback.

rifle barrel rifling

Determining proper twist is a factor of bore diameter, velocity, bullet weight and even bullet construction. There is no "golden" twist rate for all firearms. Civil war muskets such as the 1861 Springfield used extremely slow twist rates (1-in-78") to fire heavy lead bullets with relatively good accuracy, while modern AR-15-style rifles use barrels as fast as 1-in-7 to stabilize long-for-caliber projectiles.


Conventional wisdom taught us that slower twist rates wouldn't properly-stabilize a bullet, causing it to yaw. On the other hand, faster rates could over-stabilize lighter bullets, causing similar problems. This is correct in theory — however, modern ballisticians have pretty much debunked the over-stabilization theory as a practical matter. All things being equal, it is better to have too much twist than not enough.


Don't misunderstand me; serious disparities in bullet weight to twist rate can cause poor accuracy, decrease velocity and potentially compromise a weak bullet's structural integrity. I'd just prefer to err on the side of faster-twist — especially with carbine-length barrels.

Over the past decade or so, military rifles chambered in 5.56mm have migrated in two directions:

  1. Shorter guns such as 10.5-inch carbines emerged as the fight put troops in and out of vehicles and into close-quarter fighting.
  2. Accurized, Special Purpose Rifles (SPRs) were issued to fill the long-range overwatch niche between standard carbines and specialized sniper rifles.

In both cases, heavy bullets evolved as solutions for terminal and external ballistic issues. Shorter guns needed the added bullet mass to compensate for lost velocity, while the SPRs used heavier, high ballistic-coefficient bullets to gain long-range performance.

The two bullets that rose to the top of the heap were the Sierra 77-grain BTHP/OTM and the Barnes 70-grain TSX "Brown Tip." Both bullets are excellent at their intended tasks and neither will perform appropriately in the slower-twist barrels that were standard for decades.


Let's take a look at the commonly-available twist rates used in conjunction with the 5.56mm NATO/.223 Remington chambering.

1-in-14 Inches Twist Rate

You're unlikely to find a 1-in-14 barrel on any AR-15 produced in recent years, but they do exist and you may encounter them on a bolt action rifle on occasion. This is the least-versatile twist rate you'll see in the 5.56x45mm/.223 Remington chambering. Although 1-in-14 barrels can stabilize 55-grain bullets used by the original M16, it's really better suited for bullets up to 50- and 52-grains—most of which fall into the varmint and target category. If achieving maximum velocity with light bullets is your goal, this may fit for your needs — Winchester's 45-grain JHP load is a screamer at 3,600 feet per second.

1-in-12 Inches Twist Rate

This is the slowest twist still seen in large numbers on AR-15s and other .223s. Though far better than the 1-in-14 twist, it is still unsuited for some of the premium loads developed over the past decade. Conventional wisdom suggests this twist rate is perfect for bullets in the 55-to 60-grain range, though most will stabilize the common 62-grain FMJ rounds. If you hunt prairie dogs or coyotes with lightweight .223 bullets, this twist rate will do fine for your needs. Doubletap's 55-grain Nosler Ballistic Tip load generates 3,300 feet per second of velocity out of a 22-inch barrel, and will easily stabilize in this twist rate.


1-in-10 Inches Twist Rate

My first centerfire rifle was a Ruger Mini-14 with a 1-in-10 twist. This is a good twist rate for lighter bullets and will also generally stabilize projectiles up to 69 grains, such as Federal Premium's Sierra MatchKing BTHP load. If you're happy with 55- and 62-grain FMJ bullets, you don't need any more twist than this.  In my mind, however, the 1-in-10 twist is just a bit too restrictive.

1-in-9 Inches Twist Rate

This is the beginning of the road for the shooter wanting to take advantage of the heavy bullet trend. The 1-in-9 is a great compromise twist rate—not too fast to cause problems with the 55-grain bullets, but fast enough to stabilize all but the heaviest bullets under most circumstances. This twist will stabilize most traditional bullets up to 75 grains, and monolithics up to 70 grains — but they do so right at the edge of the envelope so not all rifles will do it. My personal 16-inch Rock River Arms carbine with a 1-in-9 twist does fine with ASYM's Tactical Match Grade 77-grain OTM load, but has shown signs of instability with handloads using the 70-grain Barnes TSX - unless the bullet is pushed to maximum velocity. With longer barrels and the commensurate faster velocities, this twist can be more forgiving.

1-in-8 Inches Twist Rate

For a 16-inch general-use carbine, the 1-in-8 twist is about as versatile as it gets. This twist rate will comfortably stabilize bullets up to 80-grains, and the excellent 75- and 77-grain bullets also work great at a wider spectrum of velocities — which means barrel length isn't critical. My 3-gun rifle, built by my friend Iain Harrison, wears an 18-inch, 1-in-8 twist White Oak Armament barrel and shoots just about anything well.

1-in-7 Inches Twist Rate

This is the twist chosen by the military since the switch was made to the M16A2 — and the 62-grain M855 cartridge — in the 1980s. This twist is found on the M4 carbine, the M16A4, the Mk12 Special Purpose Rifle and even the HK416. Its ability to stabilize tracer rounds in-flight is one of the reasons that the military chose this twist rate.

This barrel will stabilize bullets of up to 90 grains, and can handle the 70- to 77-grain bullets at just about any velocity, which makes it well suited for carbines with very short barrels. If you want a Mil-Spec clone, the 1-in-7 twist is the way to go.

I currently own two AR-15s with 1-in-7 twist rates — a 10.3-inch Mk18 Mod. 1 and an 18-inch Mk12 Mod. 1 — both made by Monty LeClair at Centurion Arms. To illustrate how velocity and twist rates can be the ying and the yang of bullet stability and accuracy, I fired a variety of loads side-by-side from the two rifles. The 10.3-inch SBR shoots anything from 55-grain FMJ to 77-grain OTM with excellent accuracy, while the 18-inch Mk12 is scary accurate with the 70-, 75- and 77-grain bullets — but won't shoot 55- or 62-grain FMJs worth a damn.

Matching the rifling twist in your rifle or carbine to the appropriate ammunition won't guarantee great accuracy, but it will ensure the bullet is properly stabilized in flight. On the other hand, using a bullet that's too heavy for your barrel's twist is a virtual promise of poor accuracy and ineffective terminal performance. If you're struggling with the accuracy of your modern sporting rifle, be sure you've properly matched your ammunition to the barrel's twist.

Current Magazine Cover

Enjoy articles like this?

Subscribe to the magazine.

Get access to everything Guns & Ammo has to offer.
Subscribe to the Magazine

GET THE NEWSLETTER Join the List and Never Miss a Thing.

Recommended Articles

See More Recommendations

Popular Videos

Pocket-Pistol Carry Tips and Tricks

Pocket-Pistol Carry Tips and Tricks

Pocket carry, as a method of concealed carry for a defensive firearm, can be a practical option when done right. This is especially true during the colder months when heavy outer garments can obstruct access to a traditional waistline holster. Former U.S. Navy SEAL Jeff Gonzales, president of Trident Concepts, joins G&A contributor Kimberly Heath-Chudwin to discuss guns, training and gear, including Blackhawk's TecGrip holster that can make pocket carry more successful.

Guns & Ammo TV: Cameras Don

Guns & Ammo TV: Cameras Don't Lie: 9mm vs .45 ACP

The age-old question, 9mm vs .45 ACP. For some, this has been asked and answered already. For others, the debate goes on. In this segment of “Cameras Don't Lie,” competitive shooters Patrick Sweeney and Jim Tarr head to the range to put the vaunted loads on record, and then consider the footage.

Surefire XSC Micro-Compact Pistol Light: First Look

Surefire XSC Micro-Compact Pistol Light: First Look

Small, lightweight and purpose-built for sub-compact carry guns, Surefire's XSC pistol light takes on EDC illumination segment.

Air Gun Reviews: Why Shoot Airsoft?

Air Gun Reviews: Why Shoot Airsoft?

In this Guns & Ammo TV segment, Gun Tech Editor Richard Nance and Pro-Shooter Jim Tarr discuss the benefits of airsoft training for uniformed professionals and armed citizens alike.

See More Popular Videos

Trending Articles

Don't mortgage the homestead to get into PRS, this is what's available from the likes of Mossberg, Tikka, Savage, Howa, Bergara, Weatherby and Remington.Starter Rifles for Under $1000 Rifles

Starter Rifles for Under $1000

Aaron Carter - May 09, 2019

Don't mortgage the homestead to get into PRS, this is what's available from the likes of...

The first in this new family of Springfield Armory rifles is the Model 2020 Waypoint, the result of years of engineering, testing and evaluation, combined with premium grade components found on rifles costing thousands of dollars more.First Look: Springfield Armory Model 2020 Waypoint Bolt-Action Rifle Rifles

First Look: Springfield Armory Model 2020 Waypoint Bolt-Action Rifle

Guns & Ammo Staff - September 29, 2020

The first in this new family of Springfield Armory rifles is the Model 2020 Waypoint, the...

Don't underestimate the fun factor.Review: Remington V3 TAC-13 Shotguns

Review: Remington V3 TAC-13

Brad Fitzpatrick - March 08, 2019

Don't underestimate the fun factor.

See More Trending Articles

More How-To

Once you see how easy it to effectively finish a firearm, you'll discover the long list of color combinations available, and patterns you can create. Building an AR-­15 is one thing; finishing it is another.Building Your Own AR: It's Alive! How-To

Building Your Own AR: It's Alive!

Eric R. Poole - September 22, 2020

Once you see how easy it to effectively finish a firearm, you'll discover the long list of...

Any shooter that takes the time to remove parallax will likely see slightly smaller groups because he's successfully eliminated one more variable from the shooting equation.How to Eliminate Parallax in a Riflescope How-To

How to Eliminate Parallax in a Riflescope

Tom Beckstrand - May 13, 2020

Any shooter that takes the time to remove parallax will likely see slightly smaller groups...

There aren't many people more qualified to give shooting lessons than the Green Berets. The author of this article found that out as they taught him to shoot.How to Shoot — Lessons from the U.S. Special Forces How-To

How to Shoot — Lessons from the U.S. Special Forces

Michael Venutolo-Mantovani - October 28, 2020

There aren't many people more qualified to give shooting lessons than the Green Berets. The...

See More How-To

Magazine Cover

GET THE MAGAZINE Subscribe & Save

Digital Now Included!

SUBSCRIBE NOW

Give a Gift   |   Subscriber Services

PREVIEW THIS MONTH'S ISSUE Arrow

Buy Digital Single Issues

Don't miss an issue.
Buy single digital issue for your phone or tablet.

Buy Single Digital Issue on the Guns & Ammo App

Other Magazines

See All Other Magazines

Special Interest Magazines

See All Special Interest Magazines

GET THE NEWSLETTER Join the List and Never Miss a Thing.

Phone Icon

Get Digital Access.

All Guns and Ammo subscribers now have digital access to their magazine content. This means you have the option to read your magazine on most popular phones and tablets.

To get started, click the link below to visit mymagnow.com and learn how to access your digital magazine.

Get Digital Access

Not a Subscriber?
Subscribe Now