Sightmark Pinnacle Scope Review

Sightmark Pinnacle Scope Review

sightmark-pinnacle-scope-review-1

Sightmark is a lesser known optics company, but it has recently brought a premier scope line to market. The Sightmark Pinnacle is a 1-6x24mm variable that comes with a couple of reticle choices. When I pulled the scope from the box it shipped in, two markings on the packaging gave me a lot of information about the company and the scope on loan to me.

The company is headquartered in Texas, where the design work for the Sightmark Pinnacle likely occured. There in Texas, Sightmark determined that the Pinnacle would be a 1-6X optic and have a 24mm objective lens. It also designed and set the specifications for the entire scope, to include the tenth-mil adjustable capped turrets, internal adjustment mechanisms and 30mm maintube. Last, the company designed the two reticles that would go in the Sightmark Pinnacle, the AAC and the TMD.

pinnacle-scope-review-sightmark-2


The TMD came in the Sightmark Pinnacle I evaluated, and it's one of the more useful reticles available for a 1-6X scope. There is a floating dot where the traditional crosshair would be, and the horizontal and verticle stadia lines are clearly marked in 1-mil increments. There is a large oblong circle that surrounds the stadia intersection that measures 51/2 mils tall and 3.6 mils wide.


The floating dot is small enough to work as well for precision shooting as six power allows it to. The clean 1-mil subtention also makes it possible to use the Sightmark Pinnacle with any catridge/rifle combination and not be tied to a ballistic reticle/cartridge combination. The reticle is also in the first focal plane, so the 1-mil marks will always accurately measure 1 mil regardless of our power setting.

scope-review-pinnacle-sightmark-3

The reticle has five illumination settings, available in either red or green. Reticles that illuminate in more than one color are increasingly frequent and provide us with an option previously unavailable. Traditionalists favor red, while many shooters prefer green because it contrasts more sharply with most backgrounds. Whichever you prefer, the Pinnacle can display both.

The other stamp I found interesting on the box read "Made In Japan." A lot of really good scopes get made there. Some of the most well-recognized optics companies headquartered here in the U.S. (where Sightmark does its design work) actually have their scopes built in Japan. The Sightmark Pinnacle falls into this category.


review-pinnacle-scope-sightmark-4

The scope industry is a little unique in that most companies employ management, engineers and customer service types, but the actual building of the scope gets done by only two or three big optics assembly companies. One of the best in the world is in Japan, and that's where the Sightmark Pinnacle is built. I know some pretty serious optics snobs who insist that the best glass available today comes from that factory in Japan.

Sightmark's scope has performance on par with other similarly priced 1-6X optics on the market. The company did an excellent job designing this scope and spared no expense on its manufacture. The glass offers excellent clarity, the reticle is one of the better ones available, and the 30mm maintube is robust while still offering substantial amounts of internal adjustment.


The 1-6x24mm scope was the first Pinnacle model available, and I'm interested to see how the newer models perform. The optics industry is crowded and very competitive, but there's always room at the table for one more quality manufacturer.

GET THE NEWSLETTER Join the List and Never Miss a Thing.

Recommended Articles

See More Recommendations

Popular Videos

Guns & Ammo TV: Shooting 1,270 Yards with the 5.56 NATO

Guns & Ammo TV: Shooting 1,270 Yards with the 5.56 NATO

Guns & Ammo Rifles & Optics Editor Tom Beckstrand was on location in Idaho where he pushed the limits of the 5.56 NATO cartridge in this segment of “Long Range Tech” for Guns & Ammo TV. Pairing a SIG Sauer MCX Virtus rifle loaded with Hornady's 73-grain ELD-M ammunition, Beckstrand attempted to ring steel set at 1,270 yards, an incredible distance for any 5.56-chambered rifle and beyond the typical range for an AR-15.

Guns & Ammo TV: 6.5 Creedmoor vs. .375 H&H

Guns & Ammo TV: 6.5 Creedmoor vs. .375 H&H

The 6.5 Creedmoor and the .375 H&H are almost complete opposites, or are they? The 6.5 Creedmoor is a newer and popular cartridge that transcends long-range precision rifle shooting and hunting big game. The .375 H&H is more than a century old, but still a popular and versatile choice for hunting big and dangerous game. For this shoot, Pro Tom Beckstrand, former U.S. Army Special Operations officer and sniper team leader, faces off against Guns & Ammo TV cameraman Ben LaLonde in a challenge that highlights the differences between these two cartridges.

Air Gun Reviews: Why Shoot Airsoft?

Air Gun Reviews: Why Shoot Airsoft?

In this Guns & Ammo TV segment, Gun Tech Editor Richard Nance and Pro-Shooter Jim Tarr discuss the benefits of airsoft training for uniformed professionals and armed citizens alike.

Cameras Don

Cameras Don't Lie: Subsonic 9mm vs. .300 Blackout

In this segment of "Cameras Don't Lie," a subsonic-ammo showdown, 9mm vs. .300 Blackout fired from AR rifles.

See More Popular Videos

Trending Articles

The Browning X-Bolt Hell's Canyon Speed Long Range McMillan is arguably the best production-grade precision hunting rifle available. Rifles

Review: Browning X-Bolt Hell's Canyon Speed Long Range McMillan

Joseph von Benedikt - March 25, 2019

The Browning X-Bolt Hell's Canyon Speed Long Range McMillan is arguably the best...

Don't underestimate the fun factor. Shotguns

Review: Remington V3 TAC-13

Brad Fitzpatrick - March 08, 2019

Don't underestimate the fun factor.

The story of a confederate sniper’s revenge and an exclusive look at his rifle. Historical

The Story of Civil War Sniper Jack Hinson and His Rifle

Kyle Lamb - January 12, 2018

The story of a confederate sniper’s revenge and an exclusive look at his rifle.

A guide on how to pair .223 and 5.56 NATO rifle barrel twist rates with bullet weights. Conventional wisdom says slower twist rates wouldn't properly-stabilize a heavy bullet. On the other hand, faster rates could over-stabilize lighter bullets. This is correct in theory, however, modern ballisticians have all but debunked the over-stabilization theory. All things being equal, it is better to have too much twist than not enough. How-To

Pairing Barrel Twist Rates with Bullets for .223 and 5.56 NATO

Keith Wood - November 17, 2018

A guide on how to pair .223 and 5.56 NATO rifle barrel twist rates with bullet weights....

See More Trending Articles

More Optics

The Swarovski Z5(i) P BT L 3.5-­18x44mm has a unique and versatile multiple-­zero system and an erector assembly unlike any other on the market. The Z5(i) is an excellent choice for an all-­around hunting scope. Optics

Swarovski Z5(i) P BT L 3.5-­18x44mm Scope Review

Tom Beckstrand - September 09, 2020

The Swarovski Z5(i) P BT L 3.5-­18x44mm has a unique and versatile multiple-­zero system and...

Meprolight has a lot to offer, and most of their products are built to true Mil-Spec standards with battle-proven history. They sometimes march to the beat of their own drum, but they are innovative and worth a look. Optics

Meprolight Sights

Ilya Koshkin - July 28, 2020

Meprolight has a lot to offer, and most of their products are built to true Mil-Spec standards...

Mounting a red-dot sight (RDS) to your pistol gives you an almost unfair advantage. However, for many shooters the question is, “Which RDS should I buy?” In an effort to help narrow your search, here are snapshots of six of the industry's newest red-dot pistol sights. Optics

6 Red Dot Sights for 2020

Richard Nance - July 06, 2020

Mounting a red-dot sight (RDS) to your pistol gives you an almost unfair advantage. However,...

Trijicon has dominated the Carry Optic landscape on hard-use handguns for years. With the new RMRcc, they plan on dominating the concealed carry market as well. Optics

Trijicon RMRcc Reflex Sight Review – Perfect for Concealed Carry

Jeremy Stafford - September 01, 2020

Trijicon has dominated the Carry Optic landscape on hard-use handguns for years. With the new...

See More Optics

GET THE MAGAZINE Subscribe & Save

Digital Now Included!

SUBSCRIBE NOW

Give a Gift   |   Subscriber Services

PREVIEW THIS MONTH'S ISSUE

GET THE NEWSLETTER Join the List and Never Miss a Thing.

Get Digital Access.

All Guns and Ammo subscribers now have digital access to their magazine content. This means you have the option to read your magazine on most popular phones and tablets.

To get started, click the link below to visit mymagnow.com and learn how to access your digital magazine.

Get Digital Access

Not a Subscriber?
Subscribe Now