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Guns & Ammo Tests The New Tango6 Riflescope

by Tom Beckstrand   |  September 14th, 2017 0

The Tango6 is part of SIG Sauer’s premium riflescope line that caters primarily to long-range and precision rifle work. Tango6 riflescopes can be used for hunting, but weight becomes a factor once we get to the 3-18X model tested here. These scopes pack a ton of features into an optically high-performer and SIG Sauer serves them up at a very competitive price with an amazing warranty. Here’s how the new Tango6 performed in our latest test.

This 3-18X has a 34mm tube, which means it has a lot of available elevation travel. Models are available with either mil or MOA adjustment. The elevation turret has 12 mils available per rotation and both the elevation and windage turrets lock in place when not in use.

Locking turrets are a key feature preventing inadvertent “turret adjustments” that can occur when a rifle bumps into supports typically found in the field or at a shooting competition. I learned the hard way to always look for locking turrets after zeroing a stage at a match because my turret turned without my noticing it after I brushed it against an obstacle. Lift the turret to adjust, and then push it back down to lock it in place.

SIG Sauer also includes zero stops on the Tango6 scopes. A zero stop makes it simple to always adjust a scope back to the distance at which it is zeroed by turning the turret clockwise until it stops. Setting the zero stop requires a few minutes of effort, but it makes using the scope much more convenient.

Once the scope is zeroed to the rifle, access the Tango6’S zero-stop by loosening the three Allen screws that hold the turret on the scope. Remove the turret. One screw loosens and removes the shroud that covers the zero stop. Loosen the three screws on the zero stop and spin it clockwise until it sits flush at the bottom of the turret and then tighten in back up. Put the shroud and turret back in place and that’s it. The zero-stop is now set.

The author conducted his tests of SIG’s Tango6 3-18x44 on his 6.5 Creedmoor rifle.

The author conducted his tests of SIG’s Tango6 3-18×44 on his 6.5 Creedmoor rifle.

TRACKING TEST

One of the first things I did to test the 3-18X was perform a tracking test. My test consisted of adjusting the scope across 16 mils of elevation travel. I zeroed the scope and then dialed 2 mils between shots, putting one shot at each mark until I hit 16 mils. (That much elevation adjustment gets my 6.5 Creedmoor rifle out to 1,400 yards.) I then moved back to zero, 2 mils at a time. It’s important to test as much vertical distance as possible on a tracking test because tracking errors are a percentage. If the test is only done over 4 or 5 mils, it’ll be very hard to spot any error. Over 16 mils, the results will clearly show any and all problems.

The 3-18x44mm did exceptionally well. I measured a .4-inch discrepancy between where the rounds impacted and where they should have impacted at the 16-mil mark. That’s only a 1.4 percent error, which is well within the noise of my testing procedures.

The 3-18x44 has a 34mm tube, which provided the author with lots of elevation travel. Models are available with either mil or MOA adjustment.

The 3-18×44 has a 34mm tube, which provided the author with lots of elevation travel. Models are available with either mil or MOA adjustment.

I could also detect no imperfections in reticle cant during testing. It is not unusual to see the group move relative to the vertical line. Perhaps at the point of aim the rounds impact just to the right of the line, then veer to the left as the elevation increases. Assuming the shooter holds the reticle level for each shot, that movement across and away from the vertical line is the result of a canted reticle.

The groups on my test targets stayed in the exact same location relative to the vertical line. This is not usually the case. Every manufacturer has some margin of error for reticle cant, but I could see none on the 3-18X. This is only a sample size of one scope, but it is still impressive.

The elevation turret has 12 mils available per rotation. SIG Sauer also includes zero stops on the Tango6 scopes. A zero stop makes it simple to always adjust a scope back to the distance at which it is zeroed by turning the turret clockwise until it stops.

The elevation turret has 12 mils available per rotation. SIG Sauer also includes zero stops on the Tango6 scopes. A zero stop makes it simple to always adjust a scope back to the distance at which it is zeroed by turning the turret clockwise until it stops.

ANTI-CANT SYSTEM

The LevelPlex anti-cant system that SIG Sauer has employed in this scope is a feature that I hope catches on with other manufacturers. The engineers placed a digital triangle at each end of the horizontal crosshair and, if the scope isn’t level to within a half degree, a triangle will illuminate to show which side of the reticle needs some additional elevation.

The mount I used in conjunction with the 3-18X had a level built-in, and I used it to make sure my rifle was level. I used the LevelPlex in the scope to make sure the scope was level in the mount. Once I got to the range, I used an actual 4-foot level on the target board to check my setup. Both rifle and reticle were perfectly level and no adjustments were necessary.

Both the elevation and windage turrets lock in place when not in use. A LevelPlex anti-cant system in the scope ensures the scope is level in the mount.

Both the elevation and windage turrets lock in place when not in use. A LevelPlex anti-cant system in the scope ensures the scope is level in the mount.

LevelPlex is a much easier and faster system to use than the traditional scope level. It doesn’t require the shooter to pull their attention off the scope’s field of view to level the reticle, and it is more accurate that a visual check on a bubble level that may or may not be in the exact same place every time. Half of a degree is very little cant and it takes some effort to keep a reticle that level. If that’s too sensitive, the shooter can also set the scope to a +/- 1 degree sensitivity as well. Directions in the manual show how to configure this easily.

SIG Sauer offers reticles in mils and MOA in either the first or second focal plane. Reticles are also available in standard tactical milling versions and also the new DEV-L Christmas-tree style holdover reticle, both in either MOA or MRAD, so they offer something for everybody. And every TANGO6 comes with a free SBT (SIG Ballistic Turret) custom lasered to your unique ballistics and environmental conditions. SIG’s LevelPlex system and simple zero-stop, when combined with the excellent image quality, create a scope that successfully fills a wide variety of roles.

A shroud on the front of the Tango6 helps cut down on mirage.

A shroud on the front of the Tango6 helps cut down on mirage.

SPECIFICATIONS
Sig Tango6 3-18x44mm
Power: 3X-18X
Objective: 44mm
Tube Diameter: 30mm
Elevation adjustment: .1 mil per click
Windage: .1 mil per click
Reticle: MRAD
Length: 12.4 in.
Weight: 37.6 oz.
Eye Relief: 3.7 in.
MSRP: $2,400
Manufacturer: Sig Sauer

603-610-3000
sigsauer.com

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