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G&A Vault 9: Guess this Gun

by G&A Staff  |  June 2nd, 2014 23

Identify this gun by Sunday, June 8 for your chance to win a custom holster from Wright Leather Works, LLC.

This Week's Photo
G&A Vault 9: Guess this Gun

The Winning Caption:

John Harris
It.s a Ferguson Breech loading flintlock. It is not well known but Captain Ferguson had a clear shot at George Washington at relatively short range, but did not shoot because only Washingtons Back was exposed, and gentlemen did not shoot officers in the back. There is a Ferguson on display at Cowpens Battlefield in SC. Major Ferguson was killed in SC, probably by one of my ancestors, who fought in most of the Revolutionary Wars battles in SC.
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The Prize:

Wright Leather Works Custom Holster

Win a custom Master Collection holster from Wright Leather Works, LLC.

  • Jose Velazquez

    Ferguson flintlock breech-loading rifle, c1780

    Designed by Captain Patrick Ferguson (1744-80), the Ferguson rifle was the first effective breech-loader used by the British Army. It was more accurate, easier to load and had a greater effective range than the muzzle-loading Brown Bess musket. However, the rifles were expensive to produce and considered fragile. During the American War of Independence (1775-83) Ferguson commanded a detachment of men armed with these weapons drawn from the light companies of the 6th and 14th Regiments of Foot. After Ferguson’s death in the Battle of King’s Mountain, South Carolina, in 1780, breech-loading firearms were not re-introduced into British service until the middle of the nineteenth century. Only a handful of these rifles exist today, making it one of the rarest weapons collection.

  • RMRANG

    It’s a Baker Rifle used by British Rifle companies during the Peninsular wars.
    Highly accurate but slower to reload than a musket, it was a lethal weapon in the hands of a skilled marksman.

  • John Harris

    It.s a Ferguson Breech loading flintlock. It is not well known but Captain Ferguson had a clear shot at George Washington at relatively short range, but did not shoot because only Washingtons Back was exposed, and gentlemen did not shoot officers in the back. There is a Ferguson on display at Cowpens Battlefield in SC. Major Ferguson was killed in SC, probably by one of my ancestors, who fought in most of the Revolutionary Wars battles in SC.

    • DustyG223

      John Harris,

      Congratulations! You’re the winner. Please e-mail me at dustin.gibson@imoutdoors.com with your name, address and phone number by 6/15/14 to redeem your new custom holster from Wright Leather Works.

      Thanks,
      ———————–
      Dusty Gibson
      Online Shooting Editor
      dusty.gibson@imoutdoors.com

      • John Harris

        John Harris14229 SE 179th AveCross Creek, FL 32640

        Subject: Re: New comment posted on G&A Vault 9: Guess this Gun

        • John Harris

          352-450-0893

  • Braedon A. Engle

    Looks like a “Modern Musket from the late 1800s”

  • John

    The Ferguson Rifle was one of the first breech loading rifles, to be used by the British Army
    The breech of the weapon is closed by 11 starting threads on a tapered screw, and the trigger guard serves as the crank to rotate it. One complete turn dropped the screw low enough to drop a .615 cal. round ball into the exposed breech followed by a slight overcharge of powder, which was then sheared to the proper charge by the screw as it closed the breech. Since the weapon was loaded from the breech, rather than from the muzzle, it had an amazingly high rate of fire for its day, and in capable hands fired six to ten rounds per minute.

  • Bill Chadwick

    Looks like a Ferguson with barrel cut down and rear trigger guard stud shorten.

  • Mark Cooper

    definitely a Feruson from the lock and breach

  • Wolfgang Shaffer

    Perhaps a Plains Rigle for dem Hawkins boys

  • Bob’s Gunsmithing ,

    its the Ferguson rifle, far too good for the British to use properly, they had very bad leadership from the top to the bottom of their government. It was a fast to load accurate weapon, and a really good idea. but it was hard to build with the machining tools of that time. The USA was very lucky the Brits couldn’t make them in any real numbers.

  • Bob Vela

    It is a Ferguson, not a Baker notice the rounded section just ahead of the trigger guard. That is part of the screw breech of the Ferguson and a give away.

  • Pete Inzana

    baker ? ferguson?”
    cannot make my mind up? wish I was better schooled on these older guns! i’m leaning more towards the ferguson, something tells me that is it, so i’ll sa its a ferguson flint lock!

  • Jeffrey Sacks

    The Ferguson rifle, .65 caliber, breech loading

  • lamont

    The majority has it. Clearly a Ferguson – ingenious but complicated.

  • Zahr

    Ferguson flintlock breech-loading rifle

  • Jeff

    Ferguson Flintlock

  • John

    Ferguson Flintlock breech-loading rifle

  • Pedro Marrero

    It does look like a Ferguson Rifle. There were 100 military version rifles made. 1 of which (serial number 2) is in the museum at the Morristown National Historical Park in NJ. Had the chance to have a good look at it, certainly looks like it from what I remember.

  • Fred

    .62 cal/20 gauge flintlock fusil

  • chuck

    Ferguson flintlock rifle

  • dn4nd

    savage bolt action rifle 308.

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